Mady Hornig, MD

Director of Translational Research, Center for Infection and Immunity
Associate Professor of Epidemiology
Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University

Phone: 212.342.9036
Fax: 212.342.9044
Email: mh2092@columbia.edu

 

EDUCATION & PROFESSIONAL TRAINING

Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, AB, 1978
New School for Social Research, Psychology, New York, New York, MA, 1978
Medical College of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, MD, 1988
Resident in Psychiatry, Medical Center Hospital of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont, 1988-92
Psychopharmacology Clinical and Research Fellow, Department of Psychiatry, University of Vermont, Burlington, Vermont, 1991-92
NIMH Neuropsychopharmacology Fellow, National Research Service Award, Department of Psychiatry, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, 1992-94 

BIO

Mady Hornig, MA, MD is a physician-scientist and Director of Translational Research at the Center for Infection and Immunity at the Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health where she is also Associate Professor of Epidemiology. She received her undergraduate degree from Cornell University, where she was a College Scholar, an MA in Psychology from The New School for Social Research, and an MD from The Medical College of Pennsylvania (now Drexel). Her research focuses on the role of microbial, immune and toxic factors in the development of brain conditions including autism, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (AD/HD), Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal infection (PANDAS), mood disorders, schizophrenia, myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) and cognitive disorders of aging. She is particularly interested in fetal programming of central nervous system (CNS) disorders that manifest across the life span, ranging from neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism to mood and cognitive disorders in adulthood and later life. She is internationally known for establishing animal models focused on how genes and age-related factors interact with microbes and other environmental agents to lead to inflammation and autoimmune phenomena that disrupt brain development and function. She uses immune profiling, metabolomic, proteomic, epigenetic and microbiome approaches to identify prenatal and birth biomarkers for autism in the prospective Autism Birth Cohort study in Norway and other autism birth cohorts. She is applying similar approaches to uncover markers of disturbed immunity and metabolism that correlate with the clinical deficits underlying disabling diseases such as ME/CFS with support from the Hutchins Family Foundation/Chronic Fatigue Initiative (CFI) and NIH/NIAID.

PUBLICATIONS
 

  • Hornig M, Goodman DBP, Kamoun M, Amsterdam JD. Positive and negative acute phase proteins in affective subtypes. J Affective Disord 1998;49:9-18.
  • Hornig M, Amsterdam JD, Kamoun M, Goodman DBP. Autoantibody disturbances in affective disorders: a function of age and gender? J Affective Disord 1999;55:29-37.
  • Hornig M, Weissenböck H, Horscroft N, Lipkin WI. An infection-based model of neurodevelopmental damage. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1999;96:12102-12107.
  • Hornig M, Chian D, Lipkin WI. Neurotoxic effects of postnatal thimerosal are mouse strain-dependent. Mol Psychiatry 2004;9:833-845 [cover article and Nature View feature, Nature Publishing Group, http://www.nature.com/nature/view/040617.html].
  • Hornig M, Briese T, Buie T, Bauman ML, Lauwers G, Siemetzki U, Hummel K, Rota PA, Bellini WJ, O'Leary JJ, Sheils O, Alden E, Pickering L, Lipkin WI. Lack of association between measles virus vaccine and autism with enteropathy: a case-control study. PLoS One 2008;3:e3140 [top 5 papers of 2008, Infectious Diseases Society of America]. 
  • Yaddanapudi K§, Hornig M§*, Serge R, De Miranda J, Baghban A, Villar G, Lipkin WI. Passive transfer of streptococcus-induced antibodies reproduces behavioral disturbances in a mouse model of Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcal infection (PANDAS). Mol Psychiatry 2010;15:712-726. [cover article] [§contributed equally; *corresponding author].
  • Williams BL, Hornig M, Buie T, Bauman ML, Paik MC, Wick I, Bennett A, Jabado O, Hirschberg DL, Lipkin WI. Impaired carbohydrate digestion and transport and mucosal dysbiosis in the intestines of children with autism and gastrointestinal disturbances. PLoS One 2011;6:e24585.
  • Hornig M, Briese T, Licinio J, Khabbaz RF, Altshuler LL, Potkin SG, Schwemmle M, Siemetzki U, Mintz J, Honkavuori K, Kraemer HC, Egan MF, Whybrow PC, Bunney WE, Lipkin WI. Absence of evidence for bornavirus infection in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depressive disorder. Mol Psychiatry 2012;17:486-493 (accompanied by editorial).
  • Hornig M, Montoya JG, Klimas NG, Levine S, Felsenstein D, Bateman L, Peterson DL, Gottschalk CG, Schultz AF, Che X, Eddy ML, Komaroff AL, Lipkin WI. Distinct plasma immune signatures in ME/CFS are present early in the course of illness. Sci Adv 2015;1:e1400121. 
  • Hornig M, Gottschalk CG, Peterson DL, Knox KK, Schultz AF, Eddy ML, Che X, Lipkin WI. Cytokine network analysis of cerebrospinal fluid in myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome. Mol Psychiatry 2015 [Epub ahead of print].
  • Full publication list