Sharon Greene

Sharon Greene

Sharon Greene

Adjunct Assistant Professor
Epidemiology

Office/Address:

42-09 28th St., CN 22A, WS 06-154
Queens NY 11101
Email:

Biography

As the Director of the Data Analysis Unit at the Bureau of Communicable Disease of the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene since 2012, Dr. Sharon Greene oversees spatio-temporal cluster detection, data quality assessments, and other analyses for more than 70 reportable diseases. She also serves as the lead epidemiologic consultant at the bureau, providing scientific consultation for staff and fellows embarking on projects or analyses, and reviewing abstracts and manuscripts prior to submission to scientific meetings or for publication. Previously, Dr. Greene was an epidemiologist for five years at the Department of Population Medicine at Harvard Medical School and Harvard Pilgrim Health Care Institute, focusing on near real-time vaccine safety surveillance, the use of space-time scan statistics in syndromic surveillance, and trends in the usage of antibiotic and antiviral medications. After earning her PhD in epidemiologic science, she served as an Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer in the Enteric Diseases Epidemiology Branch at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Education

PhD, 2005, University of Michigan School of Public Health
MPH, 2002, University of Michigan School of Public Health

Other Affiliations

Honors & Awards

Lead-authored article (doi: 10.3201/eid2210.160097) won first prize in scientific achievement, International Society for Disease Surveillance biosurveillance awards, 2018
Lead-authored abstract (https://cste.confex.com/cste/2018/meetingapp.cgi/Paper/9525) won Presidential Priorities Award for advancing use of informatics to improve health outcomes, Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists, 2018
Phi Beta Kappa, University of Chicago

Select Publications

Thompson CN, Lee CT, Immerwahr S, Resnick S, Culp G, Greene SK. Sampling considerations for a potential Zika virus urosurvey in New York City. Epidemiol Infect. 2018;146(13):1628-1634.
Greene SK, Lim S, Fine A. Identifying areas at greatest risk for recent Zika virus importation - New York City, 2016. PLOS Currents Outbreaks. 2018. doi: 10.1371/currents.outbreaks.00dd49d24b62731f87f12b0e657aa04c.
Greene SK, Peterson ER, Kapell D, Fine AD, Kulldorff M. Daily reportable disease spatiotemporal cluster detection, New York City, New York, USA, 2014-2015. Emerg Infect Dis: 22:1808-1812, 2016.
Greene SK, Levin-Rector A, Hadler JL, Fine AD. Disparities in reportable communicable disease incidence by census tract-level poverty, New York City, 2006-2013. Am J Public Health: 105:e27-34, 2015.
Levin-Rector A, Nivin B, Yeung A, Fine AD, Greene SK. Building-level analyses to prospectively detect influenza outbreaks in long-term care facilities: New York City, 2013-2014. American Journal of Infection Control: 43:839-43, 2015.
Levin-Rector A, Wilson EL, Fine AD, Greene SK. Refining historical limits method to improve disease cluster detection, New York City, New York, USA. Emerg Infect Dis: 21:265-272, 2015.
Greene SK, Wilson EL, Konty KJ, Fine AD. Assessment of reportable disease incidence after Hurricane Sandy, New York City, 2012. Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness: 7:513-521, 2013.
Greene SK, Huang J, Abrams AM, Gilliss D, Reed M, Platt R, Huang SS, Kulldorff M. Gastrointestinal disease outbreak detection using multiple data streams from electronic medical records. Foodborne Pathogens and Disease: 9:431-441, 2012.
Greene SK, Kulldorff M, Lewis EM, Li R, Yin R, Weintraub ES, Fireman BH, Lieu TA, Nordin JD, Glanz JM, Baxter R, Jacobsen SJ, Broder KR, Lee GM. Near real-time surveillance for influenza vaccine safety: Proof-of-concept in the Vaccine Safety Datalink Project. American Journal of Epidemiology: 171:177-188, 2010.
Greene SK, Daly ER, Talbot EA, Demma LJ, Holzbauer S, Patel NJ, Hill TA, Walderhaug MO, Hoekstra RM, Lynch MF, Painter JA. Recurrent multistate outbreak of Salmonella Newport associated with tomatoes from contaminated fields, 2005. Epidemiology and Infection: 136:157-165, 2008.

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