Sara Abiola

Sara Abiola

Sara Abiola

Assistant Professor
Health Policy and Management

Office/Address:

600 West 168th Street
New York NY USA 10032
Phone:
212-305-9885
Fax:
212-304-3405
Email:

Biography

Sara Abiola, PhD, JD focuses on empirical evaluation of the effects of public health laws on population health and the politics of developing evidence-based public health laws. Her most recent projects include measuring the effects of obesity prevention laws enacted in all 50 states on youth body mass index (BMI) and risk of overweight and obesity, developing a theoretical framework linking public health laws to health-related behaviors and outcomes, and identifying the factors that shape the use of empirical research in health policy-making. Dr. Abiola has co-authored publications on these topics in the New England Journal of Medicine, Health Affairs, American Journal of Public Health, and the Journal of Law, Medicine, and Ethics.

Topics

Education

PhD, 2011, Harvard University, Interfaculty PhD Program in Health Policy
JD, 2007, Harvard Law School
BA, 2003, Yale College

Areas of Expertise

Weight Control, Health Law

Select Publications

Blendon, RJ, Abiola, S, Benson, JM. Evidence-based policymaking in a polarized context: can the IPAB bridge the gap? Health Affairs Blog 2012
Mello, MM, Abiola, S, Colgrove, J. Pharmaceutical Companies' Role in State Vaccination Policymaking: The Case of Human Papillomavirus Vaccination American Journal of Public Health 102(5) 893-898 2012
Abiola, S, Gonzales, R, Blendon, RJ, Benson, JM. Public Perceptions of Government Performance with Health Services: A Survey of Twenty sub-Saharan African Countries Health Affairs 30(8) 1478-87 2011
Colgrove, J, Abiola, S, Mello, MM. HPV Vaccination Mandates-Lawmaking Amid Political and Scientific Controversy New England Journal of Medicine 363(8) 785-791 2010
Abiola, S. The Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act of 2008: "First Major Civil Rights Bill of the Century" Bars Misuse of Genetic Test Results Journal of Law, Medicine, and Ethics 36(4) 856-859 2008

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