Matthew Neidell

Matthew Neidell

Matthew Neidell

Associate Professor
Health Policy and Management

Office/Address:

722 W. 168th St., 4th fl.
New York NY USA 10032
Phone:
212-342-4522
Fax:
212-305-3405
Website address: Email: CV:

Biography

Professor Neidell specializes in environmental, health, and labor economics, with research primarily focused at the intersections of these. His most recent work applies the latest empirical methods to examine the relationship between the environment and a wide range of measures of well-being, including worker productivity, human capital, and decision making. Previous related work has focused on the effect of the environment on health outcomes and avoidance behavior.

Topics

Education

PhD, 2002, University of California at Los Angeles
MA, 1999, University of California at Los Angeles
BA, 1994, Duke University

Mailman Affiliations

Senior Advisor, Obesity Prevention Initiative

Other Affiliations

Areas of Expertise

Research Design and Methods, Pollution--Air/Ground/Water

Select Publications

Joshua Graff Zivin, Matthew Neidell Temperature and the allocation of time: Implications for climate change Journal of Labor Economics forthcoming 2013
Graff Zivin, J., Neidell, M. Environment, Health, and Human Capital. Journal of Economic Literature, 51(3), 2013.
Graff Zivin, J., Neidell, M. The impact of pollution on worker productivity. American Economic Review 102(7) 2012
Glied, S., Neidell, M. The Economic Value of Teeth Journal of Human Resources 45(2) 2010
Neidell, M., Waldfogel, J. Cognitive and Non-Cognitive Peer Effects in Early Education Review of Economics and Statistics 92(3) 2010
Neidell, M. Information, Avoidance Behavior, and Health: The Effect of Ozone on Asthma Hospitalizations Journal of Human Resources 44(2) 2009
Currie, J., Schmieder, J., Neidell, M. Air Pollution and Infant Health: Lessons from New Jersey Journal of Health Economics 28(3) 2009
Currie, J., Neidell, M. Air Pollution and Infant Health: What Can We Learn from California’s Recent Experience? Quarterly Journal of Economics 120(3) 2005

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