Alan Neaigus

Alan Neaigus

Alan Neaigus

Adjunct Associate Professor
Epidemiology

Office/Address:

P.O. Box 331
Millburn NJ 07041
Phone:
973-477-3403
Email:

Biography

Alan Neaigus, Ph.D., MCRP, is an Adjunct Associate Professor in the Department of Epidemiology at the Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, a Principal Investigator Emeritus at National Development and Research Institutes (NDRI), and an independent Research Consultant. Dr. Neaigus has over 25 years of experience in conducting research on the epidemiology of HIV risk. A major focus of his research has been on examining the relationship of social and risk networks to HIV infection and risk behaviors among drug users and other at-risk populations, and on the factors associated with the initiation and resumption of injection drug use among non-injection drug users. Between 2008 and 2015, he was the Director of HIV Research in the HIV Epidemiology and Field Services Program at the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (NYC DOHMH). At the NYC DOHMH he was the Principal Investigator for the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance study, which is a study supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on risk behaviors and HIV prevalence among at-risk populations (men who have sex with men, injection drug users, and heterosexuals at greater risk), and for a CDC-supported study of people living with HIV/AIDS who were receiving outpatient medical care for HIV (the Medical Monitoring Project). At NDRI, where he was the Deputy Director of the Institute for International Research on Youth at Risk and a Principal Investigator, he conducted studies supported by the National Institutes of Health on HIV/AIDS and viral hepatitis among drug users in New York City, Newark, NJ, and in other localities. He has also conducted research on the factors associated with the transition to injecting among non-injection drug users, including prospective cohort studies of non-injection heroin users in NYC and of Mexican American non-injection heroin users in San Antonio, Texas. His international research includes a study of HIV and viral hepatitis among young drug injectors in Budapest, Hungary, and a study of HIV and hepatitis C virus risk in injection drug users in Marseilles, France. His other research interests include factors associated with racial/ethnic and other disparities in HIV infection and infection risk, and the influence of the larger social structure on the risk of blood-borne and sexually transmitted infections. Among his future projects is the development of a research agenda on the care and treatment of HIV and viral hepatitis in people with bleeding disorders as well as on the factors associated with pain management and the quality of life in this population. Dr. Neaigus has given many presentations at professional meetings. He has also been invited to deliver lectures at graduate level seminars and has provided mentorship to many researchers in-training. Dr. Neaigus has authored or co-authored numerous publications in peer-reviewed journals.

Education

MCRP, 1981, Rutgers University Univ College Cam
PhD, 1976, University of California at Los Angeles
MA, 1970, University of California at Los Angeles
BA, 1968, University of California at Los Angeles

Other Affiliations

Consultant, School of Social Work, University of Southern California

Select Urban Health Activities

National HIV Behavioral Surveillance (New York City site): Between 2008 and 2015, Dr. Alan Neaigus was the Director of HIV Research in the HIV Epidemiology and Field Services Program at the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene (NYC DOHMH). At the NYC DOHMH, he was the Principal Investigator for the National HIV Behavioral Surveillance study at the New York City site, a study supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on risk behaviors, HIV testing, exposure to HIV prevention programs, and HIV prevalence among at-risk populations (men who have sex with men, injection drug users, and heterosexuals at greater risk).
HIV Risk and Neighborhood Networks of IDUs.: This study investigated the sociocentric and egocentric transmission and risk networks for HIV, hepatitis C virus and hepatitis B virus infection among new injecting drug users in socially contrasting urban areas in New York City and Newark, NJ, and also examined race/ethnic differences within and between these areas. The study explored the relationship of neighborhood health and socio-economic resources and other neighborhood characteristics to network and behavioral infection risk.
Non-Injecting Heroin Users, New Injectors and HIV Risk: This study followed a prospective cohort of non-injecting heroin users and of new injecting drug users who were non-treatment recruited in New York City to determine the behavioral and network risks for transitions to injecting and other drug use outcomes, as well as the injecting and sexual risks of infection with HIV, hepatitis B and hepatitis C.

Select Global Activities

Network Mixing and HIV Risk Among YIDUs in Budapest, Hungary: As a supplement to an ongoing study of young injecting drug users (YIDUs) in New York City, this study is investigating the characteristics of the injecting and sex risk networks of YIDUs (16-30 years of age) in Budapest, Hungary. It will focus on YIDUs? mixing patterns with injecting and sex risk network members, and the extent to which they are directly linked to higher-prevalence/ higher risk partners or comprise a bridge population that may introduce HIV and similarly transmitted pathogens into a susceptible population.
Young Drug Users and HIV Risk in Budapest, Hungary, Hungary: Ethnographic methods were used to explore the behavioral and network risks of young drug users in Budapest, Hungary and their knowledge, attitudes, beliefs and peer norms about HIV risk and prevention.
Network Risks among New Injecting Drug Users in New York City and Marseilles, France: Survey data were used to compare the network and behavioral risks for infection with HIV and hepatitis C among young, new injecting drug users (YIDUs) in New York City and Marseilles, France, and ethnographic data to explore the influence of differences in the drug use and social benefit environments in the two cities on their network and behavioral risks. The study also explored the relationship of transnational and local travel patterns on the infection risk of YIDUs.

Select Publications

Neaigus A, Reilly KH, Jenness SM, Wendel T, Marshall DM 4th, Hagan H. Multilevel risk factors for greater HIV infection of black men who have sex with men in New York City. Sex Transm Dis. 2014 Jul;41(7):433-9. doi: 10.1097/OLQ.0000000000000144.
Neaigus A, Jenness SM, Hagan H, Murrill CS, Wendel T. Reciprocal Sex Partner Concurrency and STDs among Heterosexuals at High-Risk of HIV Infection. J Urban Health. 2013 Oct;90(5):902-14
Neaigus A, Reilly KH, Jenness SM, Hagan H, Wendel T, Gelpi-Acosta C. Dual HIV Risk: Receptive Syringe Sharing and Unprotected Sex Among HIV-Negative Injection Drug Users in New York City. AIDS Behav. 2013 Sep;17(7):2501-9.
Neaigus A, Jenness SM, Hagan H, Murrill CS, Torian LV, Wendel T, Gelpi-Acosta C. Estimating HIV Incidence and the Correlates of Recent Infection in Venue-Sampled Men Who Have Sex With Men in New York City. AIDS Behav. 2012 16:516-524.
Neaigus A, Miller M, Gyarmathy VA, Friedman SR. HIV heterosexual sexual risk from injecting drug users among HIV-seronegative noninjecting heroin users. Subst Use Misuse. 2011;46(2-3):208-17.
Neaigus A, Zhao M, Gyarmathy VA, Cisek L, Friedman SR, Baxter RC. Greater drug injecting risk for HIV, HBV and HCV infection in a city where syringe exchange and pharmacy syringe distribution are illegal. J. Urban Health. 2008 May Vol. 85, No. 3, 309-322.
Neaigus A, Gyarmathy VA, Miller M, Frajzyngier VM, Zhao M, Friedman SR, Des Jarlais DC. Injecting and sexual risk correlates of HBV and HCV seroprevalence among new drug injectors. Drug Alcohol Depend. 2007 Jul 10;89(2-3):234-43.
Neaigus A, Gyarmathy VA, Miller M, Frajzyngier VM, Friedman SR, Des Jarlais DC. Transitions to injecting drug use among non-injecting heroin users: social network influence and individual susceptibility. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr.Volume 41, Issue 4, April 2006, pp. 493-503.
Neaigus A, Miller M, Friedman SR, Des Jarlais DC. Sexual Transmission Risk among Non-Injecting Heroin Users Infected with HIV or Hepatitis C. J Infect Dis 2001 Aug 1;184(3):359-63.
Neaigus A. The Network Approach and Interventions to Prevent HIV Among Injection Drug Users Public Health Reports 113 (June 1998) supplement 1 140-150 1998

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