Centers

» Centers » CSSIH » Personnel » Lisa Bates

Lisa Bates

Lisa M. Bates, a social epidemiologist, is assistant professor in the Departments of Epidemiology and Population and Family Health. Before joining the faculty of the Mailman School in 2007 she was a RWJ H&SS scholar at Columbia. She received her doctorate in 2005 from the Department of Society, Human Development, and Health at the Harvard School of Public Health. Her research focuses on how social stratification and processes of social change translate into health outcomes. Current studies focus on socioeconomic and cultural dimensions of immigrant adaptation and health in the US, with attention to life course issues, subgroup differences in the effects of immigration on health, critical perspectives on acculturation, and the role of multiple geographic and social contexts. With H&SS affiliate Julien Teitler, Bates recently submitted an NIH proposal (R03 mechanism) to test competing explanations for the apparent deterioration of health among immigrants over time in the US. Bates is also a founding member of the newly-created Cross-National Initiative on Place, Migration, and Health (CIPMH), a network of researchers in the U.S. and elsewhere committed to understanding the links between migration processes and the health of (im)migrants, their families, and their sending and receiving communities using a cross-national lens for research and policy.

She and CIPMH colleagues have recently submitted a proposal to the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation for a multi-pronged program of cross-national research. Bates combines training in social epidemiology with a background in qualitative research and international health and is concurrently engaged in research on the changing sociocultural and economic determinants of women's health and wellbeing in Bangladesh, with a particular focus on women's empowerment. She is the co-PI on a soon-to-be submitted R01 proposal examining contextual influences on the relationship between women’s empowerment and intimate partner violence in Bangladesh. Presently she is also the Epidemiology Advisor to the Millennium Villages Project at Columbia’s Earth Institute as well as a core faculty member of the H&SS program at Columbia. Bates and Teitler co-directed the H&SS Working Group on Health Disparities in 2006-2008. She is also an active member of both the Migration/Immigration and HIV/AIDS and Reproductive Health working groups of the Columbia Population Research Center (CPRC) and is one of 4 lead investigators on the CPRC seed grant recently awarded to the Migration/Immigration working group, Concepts and Measures for Immigration Research in New York City in the 21st Century.